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Who Was Uzzah in the Bible

    Who Was Uzzah in the Bible?

    If you’re looking for information about the biblical character Uzzah, you’ve come to the right place. Learn more about Uzzah, whose account is found in the Tanakh. This Israelite is associated with touching the Ark of the Covenant and is the subject of two accounts in scripture.

    Perez-Uzzah

    In the Old Testament, there is a story of a man named Perez-Uzzah, who was killed by God because he put out his hand to hold the ark, even though his oxen had stumbled and thrown it over the edge. This event made the Lord angry and he struck Uzzah dead, in the presence of the Lord. Because of this event, Perez-Uzzah in the Bible is still known as Perez-Uzzah.

    This story is a fascinating one. Uzzah was the son of David. He wiped out the Ark and took it to Obed-Edom of Gath. The name Perez-Uzzah is a PrTS verb and noun which mean “breach” or “bursting forth.” The z and ‘az in the word ‘az’ are strong and fierce.

    Al-Uzza

    During pre-Islamic times, Al-Uzzah was the chief goddess of Mecca. This goddess later became associated with Egyptian Isis and Roman Venus. She is briefly mentioned in Sura 53 of the Quran. The Qur’an describes her as “a she-devil,” a god of fertility, love, and lust. Other names for her include Mightiness, Stella, and Queen of Heaven.

    Several accounts mention Al-Uzza. In the Bible, the word “Uzza” refers to a Goddess in Arabic, whose name means “dove”. The name al-Uzza is derived from the Arabic word ‘nachalla’, which means “date palm.” In addition to being mentioned in the Bible, the goddess is mentioned in other ancient texts, including the Qur’an and the Quran.

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    Amminadab

    Amminadab was a son of Abinadab. He lived for 20 years in Kirjath Jearim and had two brothers, Eleazar and Ahio. According to the Bible, Uzzah was responsible for driving the new cart used for the ark to the city of Zion. However, his cart got stuck on a smooth rock. The oxen that were drawing the cart fell over the rock. The name Chidon is derived from the Hebrew words “threshing floor” and “Nachon,” which means “stroke.”

    Abinadab’s sons also bore the name Uzzah. In Heb 4:6-8, Uzzah and Ahio were sons of Abinadab. Their father Abinadab had four sons. The oldest was Eleazar, the second son was Uzzail, and the third was Ahio. Both Uzzah and Ahio accompanied David when he carried the ark of God to Jerusalem.

    David

    When the ark traveled through the land, Uzzah was struck dead. His death stopped the progress of the ark and dampened the merriment. It also sent the great assembly away in fear. It was David’s fault that he forgot to seek God before the ark traveled through the land.

    It is important to note that Uzzah was not a Kohathite. The Bible says that he was a son of Abinadab. It is likely that his brother Ahio was the one who drove the cart that contained the ark. Ahio cleared the way and led the oxen. Uzzah followed close to the cart as the oxen strained and shook it.

    David’s reaction to Uzzah’s death was not a logical one. He should have humbled himself under the hand of God and continued his good works. Instead, he was displeased, and his anger was kindled by his displeasure. The same word is used for God’s displeasure in 2 Samuel 6:7.

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    Ark of the covenant

    Uzzah was a man of God who helped the men of Israel carry the ark to Jerusalem. The ark was only allowed to be carried by authorized individuals, and the Lord had chosen representatives from all the people of Israel to act as escort. While Uzzah was in charge of the cart that held the ark, the oxen pulling it started to shake and Uzzah tried to steady it. When Uzzah failed, the ark fell and he was struck by the Lord.

    The ark was very sacred and Uzzah’s touch of it was unclean. This was against the law of the covenant, which says that no one should touch it, and this act was an open violation of the law. Since Uzzah was familiar with the ark, he might have erred by assuming that it was holy.

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